Communities

Neighborhood Map

Upper West Side

Located north of Columbus Circle from 59th to 110th Street, between Central Park West and the Hudson River, the Upper West Side is a primarily residential area. Although it does have an older demographic, it is comfortably inhabited by singles and families, and the young and old alike. Its diverse population reflects its range of housing as well, from affordable walk-ups to brownstones and luxury doorman buildings, many of which are some of the most sought-after addresses in the city. Generally, the further north, the better deals there are in the area. Home to many writers, artists and actors, the area has several cultural institutions and museums, such as the American Museum of Natural History, the Children’s Museum of Manhattan and Lincoln Center, where the Metropolitan Opera, the New York City Ballet and The New York Philharmonic can be found. Other local amenities include numerous gourmet supermarkets, such as the well-known Zabar’s and the Shops at Columbus Circle, an upscale shopping mall in the Time Warner Center with retail stores and eateries. Many other restaurants, cafes and great shops can also be found throughout the Upper West Side. It also boasts easy access to Central Park, which runs all the way along its east side, and to the west there is Riverside Park, with paths for biking, running and walking. With its pre-war architecture and cultural charm, the Upper West Side has been the setting for many movies and television shows throughout the years.

Upper East Side

Running east of Central Park to the East River from 59th to 96th Streets, the Upper East Side is known for some of the priciest and most prestigious real estate in Manhattan as well as the world. Despite its elite reputation, it is also where some great deals can be found. Fifth, Madison and Park Avenues, particularly in the sixties and seventies, are home to expensive luxury doorman residents and elegant townhouses. East of Lexington Avenue (where the area’s only subway lines run along) are the better bargains, where the prices are generally lower the farther away from the subway you go. Here, the housing includes everything from pre-war and post war co-ops and condos, to full service buildings, less expensive townhouses, and a large inventory of studio to two bedroom walk-ups. The diverse housing of the Upper East Side creates a mix of young professionals, families, retirees and the New York City elite. Catering to its wealthy residents, is Manhattan’s most famous and upscale shopping area on Madison Avenue, which borders the Upper East Side to the south, and is home to department stores, like Bloomingdales and Barneys, as well as designer boutiques. The neighborhood is full of plenty of restaurants and bars, from upscale to good, cheap eats. Of course, one of the Upper East Side’s best features is its close proximity to Central Park and to many of the world’s best museums along Museum Mile, including the Frick Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney and Guggenheim.

Midtown West/Hell’s Kitchen

Midtown West occupies the area west of Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River, between roughly 40th and 59th Streets. The main residential area of Midtown West is known as Hell’s Kitchen, and is located west of Eighth Avenue. Dominated for years by low rise walk-up buildings, the area has seen a lot of growth in the last couple of decades with an influx of more well-off residents, and as a result, is now home to high-rise condos and several other upscale buildings with luxury finishes and amenities. Living in these places are many professionals. The development of the area has also given rise to trendy shops, restaurants and bars, with many different and affordable options. Midtown West is also home to many high-traffic tourist areas, such as Times Square, the Theater District and Rockefeller Center. Although these places can be very congested, they offer great access to numerous subway lines.

Midtown East/Murray’s Hill

Situated between Fifth Avenue and the East River, and 42nd and 59th Streets, Midtown East as a largely commercial area with numerous office buildings. As a result, many of the apartments are high-rises, with several luxury condos located around Second and Third Avenues. An exception to the area is the prestigious Sutton Place, an upscale, beautiful area of the city with luxury townhouses and pre-war doorman buildings. Located on the far east side between 54th and 59th Streets, the area also boasts spectacular views of the East River.

For those who want the easy access to Midtown without all the congestion, Murray Hill is a great option. Running from around 42nd to 29th Street, from Fifth Avenue to the East River (some define the area east of Second Avenue as Kips Bay), Murray Hill has many doorman buildings as well as pre-war brownstones and townhouses, which tend to be more affordable than ones uptown or in the Village. Previously home to mainly older residents, today more young professionals have moved into the area. With the younger residents more restaurants and bars have sprung up.

Union Square/Gramercy/Flatiron

Union Square, is the area surrounding the park of the same name, bordering Broadway to the west, Park Avenue South to the east, 14th Street to the south and 17th Street to the north. Although a retail and restaurant dominated area, its residential dwellings include pre-war buildings and lofts. With its small inventory and high demand, prices are on the high side. The park recently went through a renovation and redesign, which included a 15,000 square foot playground, restored pavilion and more trees. One of  the park’s major attractions is its Greenmarket. Opened year-round, four days a week, this open air market features vendors selling fresh goods from local farms, including vegetables, fruits, meat, seafood, jams, bread, eggs and plants. Surrounding the park and on its nearby streets are several excellent restaurants.

Centered around the exclusive Gramercy Park, located on Lexington Avenue between 20th and 22nd Streets, Gramercy is bordered by 14th Street to the south, First Avenue to the east, 23rd Street to the north, and Park Avenue South to the west. The area has medium-sized co-ops, pre-war and post-war buildings, as well as townhouses and luxury doorman buildings. The priciest real estate is around Gramercy Park, which is only opened to surrounding residents who have a key to enter it. Further east of Third Avenue, prices tend to drop, and as a result so do the ages and income level of the residents. The area closer to the park is home to many wealthy politicians, writers, socialites, and celebrities. Although mainly residential, Gramercy does have some excellent, notable restaurants.

A small area near Midtown, the Flatiron District was named after the famous Flatiron building, noted for its triangle shape (hence the name) and was designed to accommodate the angle of the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway where it was built. It roughly includes the area between 34th and 14th Streets, and is bordered by Park Avenue to the east and Sixth Avenue to the west. Most of its apartments are lofts or in newer buildings. The area’s major attractions are Madison Square Park, a small beautiful park located at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway between 23rd and 26th Streets, and its many retail stores and restaurants.

Chelsea

Running from Sixth Avenue to the Hudson River and from 15th to 34th Street, Chelsea is a colorful area, noted for its art galleries, restaurants and many pretty, tranquil, streets lined with trees and brownstones. The area’s housing includes everything from pre-war walk-ups to condos and doorman buildings, to newly built apartments with luxury amenities. It’s a primarily residential neighborhood known for its “melting-pot of cultures,” with many amenities and attractions. Known as the art center of New York City, Chelsea has more than 200 galleries as well as many diverse restaurants, clothing boutiques, retail and discount store, and clubs. One of the area’s newest attractions is the High Line, a public park that was built on old elevated railroad tracks. Currently only a small section is opened, but when it’s completed it will be 1.5 miles long. The area is also home to the Chelsea Market, an indoor space with several restaurants and some of the city’s best food retail stores, and Chelsea Piers, a sports complex that has a gym and spa as well as an array of athletic activities, such as ice skating and golf.

Greenwich Village/West Village

Located between 14th Street and West Houston and bordered on the west by the Hudson River and on the east by Broadway, this area is often referred to as “The Village.” The area west of Sixth Avenue is usually used to distinguish the West Village from Greenwich Village. The area feels different from much of the rest of Manhattan because of its short buildings and its small, “off the grid” streets, which run at different angles. Because of its shorter, older buildings, the housing in the area includes mainly older, pre-war brownstones with many small, walk-up apartments. However, the area does have several doorman buildings and beautiful townhouses. Throughout its history, the area has been knows for its creative residents, such as artists and writers. Although today many artists have been priced out of the area, it still has a liberal, creative and open-minded feel. Noted for its picturesque, quiet tree-lined streets, it is one of the most desirable areas to live in Manhattan, and therefore is one of the most expensive. It’s home to many notable small bars, restaurants, boutiques and independent shops, as well as the famous Washington Square Park, which recently underwent a renovation and redesign. Bordering the area to the north is the Meatpacking District (roughly from West 15th to Gansevoort Street and from Hudson Street to the Hudson River). As its name suggests, it’s home to many meatpacking plants and slaughterhouses. Although today several still remain, starting in the 1990s, the area has been transformed and is now populated with ultra-trendy boutiques, restaurants, bars and clubs.

SoHo

An acronym to describe its northern border, SoHo stands for “South of Houston (Street).” It’s also bordered by Canal Street to the north, Lafayette Street to the east and the Hudson River to the west. Famous for its loft-style apartments, cast-iron architecture, cobblestone Streets, numerous stores and celebrity residents, SoHo is no longer the affordable artist haven that it was in the 1970s. Although there are several art galleries left over from this time, today the old artist studios are high-priced real estate. In addition to lofts, SoHo also has some luxury and condo buildings in the western portion of the area and some more economical, smaller walk-up apartments. With its expensive apartments, the residents are mainly well-off singles and couples. SoHo’s streets are filled with tourists most of the time, making the area very crowded, especially on weekends. Visitors flock here mainly for its shopping, which includes a branch of practically every uptown Madison Avenue store as well as many national retail stores. The area also has several gourmet stores and supermarkets, and many notable restaurants.

Tribeca

Tribeca is an acronym for its location, standing for “Triangle Below Canal.” Its borders are Vesey Street to the south, Canal Street to the north, Hudson Street to the west and Broadway to the east. This area is known for being posh, trendy and affluent, with many celebrity residences and families due to its larges spaces, quiet streets and good schools. Many wealthy professionals, couples and financial district workers also populate Tribeca. Tribeca has many large lofts, which were converted from warehouses dating back to the 1800s. It also has a small collection of wood and brick houses. Although much of the existing real estate has been converted, many new glass-style condos have been popping up in the area. Tribeca also attracts residents with its upscale, trendy dining, which includes some of the city’s best restaurants.

Financial District

The Financial District is considered the area at the southern tip of Manhattan, south of City Hall Park, excluding the area known as Battery Park City. Home to most of the city’s financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange on Wall Street, the area is well-populated with those who work in the area. The Financial District has gone through a metamorphosis since the events of September 11. Initiated by government grants and tax incentives for residential conversion and construction in the area following 9/11, many of its office spaces have been converted into luxury doorman buildings.  A great number of these buildings come with many amenities, such as gyms and shared indoor and outdoor recreation spaces, and some even have spectacular views of the Hudson and East Rivers, the Brooklyn Bridge and the Statue of Liberty. Although the area is becoming more residential, its population shrinks significantly on weekends and at night when the financial workers leave, changing from congested to quiet. Aside from work proximity, the area is also appealing for its access to around a dozen subway lines as well as the Path train to New Jersey, the South Street Seaport, with shops, including an indoor mall and several restaurants, and the large discount department store Century 21. With its growing number of residents, there are increasingly more restaurants and stores in the area, with more of them accommodating not just the business community, but also the residential one.

Battery Park City

Bordered on the east by West Street, to the north by Vesey Street and to the west and south by the Hudson River, this waterfront community offers proximity to Lower Manhattan offices, without feeling like you are living in the city, and as a result appeals to many financial workers. Only in existence since the 1980s when it was constructed on a landfill area created from the excavated soil from the building of the World Trade Center, it is dominated by modern high-rise buildings, built throughout the past few decades. Many of these buildings not only have luxury amenities, but also have beautiful water views of the Hudson River, Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Battery Park has many green spaces, with a harbor and long pathway along the water for biking, walking and running. Although it’s mainly dominated by apartment buildings, the area includes a mall known as the Winter Garden, located in the World Financial Center, and another nearby shopping complex with a movie theater, discount store and several restaurants.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Upper West Side

Situato a nord di Columbus Circle, dalla 59th alla 110th Street tra Central Park West e il fiume Hudson, l’Upper West Side è principalmente una zona residenziale. Benché vi abiti anche una popolazione più matura, è un quartiere accogliente per single e famiglie, giovani e anziani. Questa popolazione diversificata riflette anche l’assortimento di abitazioni, dai “walk-up” (edifici da tre a cinque piani senza ascensore) alle “brownstone” (edifici in arenaria rossa), a lussuosi palazzi con portineria, molti dei quali sono tra gli indirizzi più ambiti della città. Generalmente, più si va a nord più si trovano buoni affari. in zona vivono molti scrittori, artisti e attori, e hanno sede diverse organizzazioni culturali e musei, come l’American Museum of Natural History, il Children’s Museum of Manhattan ed il Lincoln Center, dove si trovano la Metropolitan Opera, il New York City Ballet e la New York Philarmonic. Tra le altre attrattive locali, si possono includere numerosi gourmet supermarket (supermercati specializzati nella vendita di prelibatezze e specialità varie), come il celebre Zabar’s e lo Shops at Columbus Circle, uno sfarzoso centro commerciale situato all’interno del Time Warner Center, che ospita negozi e ristoranti alla moda. Molti altri ristoranti, caffè e negozi di qualità si trovano ovunque nell’Upper West Side. L’Upper West Side vanta inoltre un facile accesso a Central Park, che si snoda per tutta la lunghezza del lato est, mentre ad ovest c’è Riverside Park, con piste ciclabili e da jogging e passeggiate. Con la sua architettura prebellica e un certo fascino culturale, l’Upper West Side è diventato, nel corso degli anni, scenario di molti film e serie tv.

Upper East Side

Snodandosi a est di Central Park verso l’East River tra la 59th e la 96th Street, l’Upper East Side è noto per avere le più costose e prestigiose proprietà immobiliari di Manhattan e del mondo. Nonostante la sua reputazione di zona d’élite, vi si possono trovare anche dei buoni affari. La Fifth Avenue, la Madison e la Park Avenue, in particolar modo tra la 60th e la 79th Street, ospitano costose abitazioni di lusso con portineria ed eleganti “townhouse” (case a schiera da tre a cinque piani). Ad est di Lexington Avenue (dove passano le uniche linee di metropolitana della zona) si trovano le occasioni migliori; i prezzi generalmente si abbassano tanto più ci si allontana dalla metropolitana. Qui si trovano diversi tipi di abitazioni, dagli appartamenti in cooperativa (co-op) e in condomini prebellici e postbellici, ai palazzi dotati di ogni tipo di servizi, alle townhouse dai prezzi più contenuti, ad una vasta scelta di monolocali o bilocali all’interno di walk-up. La variegata offerta di abitazioni dell’Upper East Side dà luogo ad un mix di giovani professionisti, famiglie, pensionati ed élite newyorkese. A soddisfare i suoi residenti più facoltosi, l’area shopping più famosa e alla moda di Manhattan, situata sulla Madison Avenue, che delimita l’Upper East Side a sud e ospita grandi magazzini, come Bloomingdales e Barneys, nonché boutique di alta moda. Il quartiere è ricco di ristoranti e bar, che spaziano da quelli più lussuosi a quelli più convenienti, fino a quelli molto economici. Naturalmente, una delle caratteristiche migliori dell’Upper East Side è l’estrema vicinanza a Central Park, e la presenza di molti tra i migliori musei del mondo lungo il Museum Mile, come la Frick Collection, il Metropolitan Museum of Art, il Whitney e il Guggenheim.

Midtown West/Hell’s Kitchen

Midtown West occupa l’area a ovest della Fifth Avenue verso il fiume Hudson, più o meno tra la 40th e la 59th Street. La zona residenziale principale di Midtown West è conosciuta come Hell’s Kitchen, ed è collocata a ovest della Eighth Avenue. Caratterizzata per anni da walk-up di pochi piani, l’area ha registrato una crescita considerevole negli ultimi due decenni con una maggiore affluenza di residenti benestanti e, di conseguenza, si trova ora ad ospitare condomini di molti piani e altri edifici sontuosi, dotati di servizi e finiture di lusso. Molti professionisti vivono in questi palazzi. La crescita di quest’area ha inoltre fatto sorgere negozi, ristoranti e bar alla moda, offrendo scelte diverse e convenienti. Midtown West ospita anche numerose aree turistiche altamente trafficate, come Times Square, il Theater District e il Rockfeller Center. Benché questi posti possano essere sovraffollati, offrono un ottimo accesso a numerose linee della metropolitana.

Midtown East/Murray’s Hill

Situato tra la Fifth Avenue e l’East River, tra la 42th e la 59th Street, il quartiere di Midtown East è dotato di un’area in gran parte commerciale, costellata dalle sedi di numerosi uffici. Di conseguenza, parecchi appartamenti si trovano in palazzi di molti piani, con diversi condomini lussuosi collocati nei pressi della Second e della Third Avenue. Un’eccezione è il prestigioso Sutton Place, una bellissima area di lusso, con suntuose townhouse ed edifici prebellici con portineria. Situata nell’estremo est, tra la 54th e la 59th Street, questa zona vanta inoltre viste spettacolari dell’East River.

Per tutti coloro che desiderano usufruire di un facile accesso a Midtown, evitando la ressa, Murray Hill costituisce un’ottima alternativa. Snodandosi più o meno tra la 42th e la 29th Street dalla Fifth Avenue all’East River (alcuni chiamano Kips Bay l’area a est della Second Avenue), Murray Hill è disseminata sia di palazzi con portineria sia di townhouse e brownstone prebelliche, che tendenzialmente sono più economiche rispetto a quelle dei quartieri alti o del Village. Un tempo abitata soprattutto da persone di una certa età, oggi molti giovani professionisti si sono trasferiti nel quartiere, con un afflusso tale da far sorgere numerosi bar e ristoranti.

Union Square/Gramercy/Flatiron

Union Square è l’area che circonda il parco omonimo, confinante a ovest con la Broadway, a est con Park Avenue South, a sud con la 14th Street e a nord con la 17th Street. Benché si tratti di una zona piena prevalentemente di negozi al dettaglio e ristoranti, non mancano gli edifici residenziali, in particolare costruzioni prebelliche e loft. Data la poca disponibilità e la grande richiesta, i prezzi sono tendenzialmente alti. Il parco è stato di recente sottoposto a un’operazione di rinnovo e riprogettazione, in seguito alla quale è stata costruita un’area ricreativa di circa 1.400 m2, è stato restaurato un padiglione e sono stati piantati più alberi. Una delle principali attrattive del parco è il Greenmarket. Aperto tutto l’anno, quattro giorni a settimana, questo mercato all’aperto è caratterizzato da venditori che offrono prodotti freschi provenienti dalle fattorie locali, come frutta e verdura, carne, frutti di mare, marmellate, pane, uova e piante. A circondare il parco, nelle strade adiacenti, si trovano diversi ristoranti di qualità.

Imperniato sull’esclusivo Gramercy Park, situato sulla Lexington Avenue tra la 20th e la 22th Street, Gramercy confina con la 14th Street a sud, la First Avenue a est, la 23th Street a nord e Park Avenue South a ovest. L’area è caratterizzata sia da co-op di media grandezza, edifici prebellici e postbellici, sia da townhouse e palazzi lussuosi con portineria. Le proprietà immobiliari più costose si trovano attorno al Gramercy Park, aperto solo ai residenti della zona, dotati di chiave per accedervi. Più a est rispetto alla Third Avenue i prezzi tendono ad abbassarsi, e di conseguenza anche l’età ed il reddito dei residenti. Nell’area più vicina al parco vivono molti politici, scrittori e personaggi famosi facoltosi. Pur essendo una zona principalmente residenziale, a Gramercy si trovano anche ristoranti eccellenti e prestigiosi.

Piccola area vicino Midtown, il Flatiron District prende il nome dal celebre Flatiron building (“ferro da stiro”), noto per la sua forma triangolare (da cui deriva il nome) e progettato per contenere l’angolo d’intersezione tra la Fifth Avenue e Broadway, su cui è stato costruito. Comprende pressappoco l’area tra la 34th e la 14th Street, e confina con Park Avenue a est e la Sixth Avenue a ovest. La maggior parte degli appartamenti che lo caratterizzano è costituita da loft o da edifici più recenti. Le maggiori attrattive della zona sono il Madison Square Park, un bellissimo parchetto situato tra la Fifth Avenue e Broadway all’incrocio tra la 23th e la 26th Street, e i molti ristoranti e negozi al dettaglio.

Chelsea

Snodandosi dalla Sixth Avenue al fiume Hudson e dalla 15th alla 34th Street, Chelsea è una zona piena di colore, famosa per le gallerie d’arte, i ristoranti e le strade incantevoli e tranquille, alberate e costellate di brownstone. Le abitazioni comprendono edifici di ogni tipo, dai walk-up prebellici ai condomini, dai palazzi con portineria agli appartamenti di recente costruzione, dotati dei più lussuosi comfort. Si tratta di un quartiere prevalentemente residenziale, noto per il suo melting pot di culture, ricco di servizi e attrazioni. Considerato il centro artistico di New York, Chelsea vanta più di 200 gallerie, oltre a numerosi ristoranti di ogni tipo, boutique d’abbigliamento, negozi al dettaglio, discount e club. Tra le attrattive più recenti c’è la High Line, un parco pubblico costruito sui binari di una vecchia ferrovia sopraelevata in disuso. Finora è stata aperta al pubblico soltanto una piccola sezione, ma una volta completato il parco avrà una lunghezza di quasi 3 km. L’area ospita inoltre il Chelsea Market, uno spazio coperto dotato di svariati ristoranti e di alcuni tra i migliori negozi alimentari della città, e il Chelsea Piers, un complesso sportivo che offre palestra, centro benessere e un vasto assortimento di attività atletiche, tra cui pattinaggio su ghiaccio e golf.

 

Greenwich Village/West Village

Situata tra la 14th Street e West Houston, delimitata a nord dal fiume Hudson e ad est da Broadway, spesso ci si riferisce a questa zona con il nome di “The Village”. L’area che si trova ad ovest della Sixth Avenue è spesso usata come linea di divisione tra il West Village e il Greenwich Village. Questa zona di Manhattan sembra diversa da molte altre per via degli edifici bassi e delle strade strette e “senza reticolato” che seguono linee curve. Gli edifici del quartiere sono bassi e antichi, perciò le abitazioni sono rappresentate principalmente da brownstone antiche e prebelliche, costituite da molti piccoli appartamenti walk-up. Tuttavia, la zona presenta molti palazzi con portineria e bellissime townhouse. Nel corso della sua storia, il quartiere è diventato famoso per il fatto di ospitare residenti creativi, come artisti e scrittori. Sebbene molti artisti abbiano lasciato il quartiere a causa dei prezzi molto elevati, si ha ancora la sensazione che sia liberale, creativo e di larghe vedute. Famosa per le strade pittoresche e alberate, è una delle zone più ambite dove vivere a Manhattan e di conseguenza è una tra le più care. Vi sono molti piccoli bar, ristoranti, boutique e negozietti famosi nonché il celebre Washington Square Park, che è stato recentemente rinnovato e ridisegnato. A nord il quartiere è delimitato dal Meatpacking District (approssimativamente da West 15th a Gansevoort Street e da Hudson Street al fiume Hudson). Come si intuisce dal nome, vi sono molti mattatoi e stabilimenti per il confezionamento delle carni (“meatpacking”). Anche se ad oggi ne rimangono ancora parecchi, la zona ha cominciato a trasformarsi a partire dagli anni ‘90 e adesso vanta numerose boutique, ristoranti, bar e club molto alla moda.

SoHo

SoHo, acronimo che sta a indicare i confini a nord, sta per “South of  Houston (Street)”, a sud di Houston Street. È delimitato anche da Canal Street a nord, da Lafayette Street a est e dal fiume Hudson a ovest. Famoso per i loft, per l’architettura in ghisa, le strade pavimentate di ciottoli, i tanti negozi e le celebrità che vi risiedono, SoHo non è più l’accessibile rifugio degli artisti che era negli anni ’70. Anche se rimangono varie gallerie d’arte dell’epoca, quelli che erano studi di artisti sono oggi immobili molto costosi. Oltre ai loft, nella zona a ovest di SoHo vi sono condomini di lusso e alcuni appartamenti walk-up più economici e più piccoli. Dati i prezzi elevati degli appartamenti gli abitanti sono per lo più single e coppie benestanti. Le strade di SoHo sono piene di turisti per la maggior parte del tempo, il che rende la zona molto affollata, soprattutto nei weekend. I visitatori si affollano qui principalmente per fare shopping in negozi che comprendono praticamente ogni tipo di negozio del quartiere residenziale di Madison Avenue e molti negozi di vendita al dettaglio nazionali. Nella zona vi sono anche molti negozi e supermercati di cibi pregiati e ristoranti famosi.

Tribeca

Tribeca è un acronimo dovuto alla posizione, che sta per “Triangle Below Canal”, triangolo sotto Canal (Street). Confina con Vesey Street a sud, Canal Street a nord, Hudson Street a ovest e Broadway a est. Il quartiere è famoso per essere chic, ricco e alla moda, e ospita residenze ufficiali e famiglie celebri grazie agli ampi spazi, alle strade silenziose e alle scuole di buon livello. Tribeca è abitata anche da molti professionisti, coppie e persone benestanti che lavorano nel distretto finanziario. Nel quartiere di Tribeca vi sono molti loft di grandi dimensioni, ricavati da magazzini risalenti all’Ottocento. È presente anche un piccolo gruppo di case in legno e mattoni. Sebbene sia stato convertito l’uso di gran parte degli immobili preesistenti, sono comparsi all’improvviso molti palazzi condominiali di nuova costruzione. Tribeca attira abitanti anche per i punti di ristorazione di alto livello e alla moda, tra i quali vi sono alcuni dei migliori ristoranti della città.

Financial District

L’area denominata “Financial District” è quella all’estremo sud di Manhattan e a sud di City Hall Park, esclusa la zona conosciuta come “Battery Park City”. Sede di molti istituti finanziari della città, inclusa la Borsa di New York a Wall Street, l’area è ampiamente popolata da chi vi lavora. In seguito agli eventi dell’11 settembre, il Financial District ha subito una metamorfosi. Iniziata con le sovvenzioni del governo e gli incentivi fiscali per la costruzione e la conversione degli immobili residenziali nella zona in seguito all’11 settembre, molti degli spazi adibiti un tempo ad uffici sono stati trasformati in lussuosi edifici con portineria. La maggior parte di questi palazzi è dotata di strutture come palestre e spazi ricreativi comuni, sia coperti sia scoperti, ed alcuni offrono anche una vista spettacolare del fiume Hudson e dell’East River, del ponte di Brooklyn e della Statua della Libertà. Sebbene l’area stia diventando sempre più residenziale, la confusione si tramuta in tranquillità durante i weekend e di sera, quando gli impiegati finanziari vanno via e la popolazione si riduce notevolmente. Al di là della vicinanza al posto di lavoro, l’area è molto invitante perché consente l’accesso a una dozzina di linee della metropolitana oltre che al treno per il New Jersey e al porto di South Street, dove ci sono molti negozi, compreso un centro commerciale coperto e numerosi ristoranti, nonché l’enorme outlet Century 21. Poiché il numero di residenti è in continuo aumento, nella zona vi sono sempre più ristoranti e negozi, la maggior parte dei quali cerca di accontentare non solo la comunità lavorativa, ma anche quella residenziale.

Battery Park City

Delimitata a est da West Street, a nord da Vesey Street e a ovest e sud dal fiume Hudson, questa zona sul fiume offre vicinanza agli uffici di Lower Manhattan, senza dare l’impressione di vivere in città, e attrae quindi molti impiegati finanziari. Nata solo negli anni ‘80 quando fu costruita su un’area adibita a discarica creata con il terreno scavato durante la costruzione del World Trade Center, è dominata da moderni grattacieli costruiti negli ultimi decenni. Molti di questi edifici possiedono non solo strutture e servizi di lusso ma offrono anche delle splendide viste del fiume Hudson, della Statua della Libertà e di Ellis Island. Battery Park ha molti spazi verdi, con un porto e un percorso lungo il fiume per andare in bicicletta, camminare e correre. Sebbene prevalgano gli edifici adibiti a uso residenziale, l’area comprende il centro commerciale “Winter Garden”, situato all’interno del World Financial Center, e un altro complesso commerciale con un cinema, un grande magazzino e numerosi ristoranti.